My Top Five Books of 2013

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These are my recommended reads from this year…….five , in no particular order , and then 3 more I really enjoyed but Top Eight didn’t seem a catchy enough title!

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1.The Goldfinch  by Donna Tartt

I have already reviewed it here on my blog . We follow the adventures of Theo Decker from childhood to adulthood accompanied by The Goldfinch, a painting recovered from a bomb attack , his talisman and his curse.

2. The Luminaries   by Eleanor Catton

Another slab of a book that I have already reviewed here.

Deserved winner of this year’s Man Booker Prize,  this is a murder mystery with a Victorian feel and an astrological structure.

3. Americanah  by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche

A searingly honest account of the search for identity of two young people. Told in narrative style but also through blog posts, Ifem and Obinze journey from Nigeria to the US and London . Both have experiences that cause them to confront their  perceptions of  themselves as well as other people’s preconceptions of them as Africans. Whilst they are away, Nigeria is changing and they both return to a country very different to the one they left. Above all, however, this is a love story.

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4, A Tale For The Time Being  by Ruth Ozeki

This was on the Man Booker Prize shortlist. It tells the stories of Ruth,a Canadian writer,  and a teenage Japanese girl, Nao ,whose diary Ruth finds washed up on the shores near her home in the aftermath of the Tsunami. Nao’s diary recounts her own struggle against bullying as well as the story of her grandmother, a buddhist priest, and her uncle, a reluctant pilot in World War 2. Ozeki plays with time, place and memory to create a magical tidal wave of a story.

5. The Infatuations by Javier Marias

A metaphysical crime thriller. Marias uses the voice of a female narrator, something he said he would never do, to examine the nature of love, loss, time and storytelling.There is a playful poke at the publishing industry and the ‘conceit’ of being a novelist.

It’s a novel and once you have finished a novel, what happened in it is of little importance and soon forgotten. What matters are the possibilities and ideas that the novels imaginary plot communicates to us and infuses us with,a plot we recall far more vividly than real events….

A masterpiece.

And now the honourable mentions…..

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1. The Night Rainbow  by Claire King

Meet Pea, who’s struggling to make sense of why her mother is so sad and what she can do to help.Quirky and evocative, this is a real page turner with a big surprise.

2. Nothing Holds Back The Night   by Delphine de Vigan

A blend of autobiography and fiction, this is a woman’s struggle to understand her mother …..and her family. Outwardly gifted, successful and privileged, privately they are torn by violence and dark secrets. Beautifully written.

3. Dear Life  by Alice Munro

The latest collection of short stories from the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. Thought provoking and moving, she makes every word count. Train will hit you like an express at full speed. 

So that is my round up of the year’s best……..I would love to know your top reads of 2013.

Harvest by Jim Crace

 

Harvest Jim Crace

At the time of writing, this is the bookie’s favourite for the Man Booker Prize 2013 by some considerable way.

It is a beautifully written book.Set in an English village during encroachment ,it follows the fortunes of the manor house and villagers seen through the eyes of Walter Thirsk, himself an outsider of sorts.

The arrival of 3 strangers , displaced from elsewhere, follows a mysterious fire at the manor house. The villagers, for their own reasons, are quick to lay the blame at the door of the strangers which sets off a chain of events leading to the eventual destruction of a way of life.

The prose is lyrical and Crace captures the claustophobic and suspicious atmosphere of a community that have never strayed more than a few hundred metres from their cottages.

Encroachment went on in the English country side from the 13th Century right up to the 19th and I found it impossible to place the narrative in any particular period. This however adds to the picture of a timeless way of life suddenly shattered and lost forever.

Personally, I would be surprised if this won the prize….the writing is truly beautiful but ‘ histotical fiction’ has won twice very recently with Hilary Mantel’s Wolf Hall and it’s sequel Bring Up The Bodies and despite it’s beautiful prose Harvest is yet another reworking of British history…………but then, what do I know?